Danes dissatisfied with their sex lives

A third of those in a relationship regard their sex life as simply ‘average’

In a relationship? No fun in the bedroom? You are not alone according to a recent survey by Megafon.

Results show that 33 percent of Danes living as a couple regard their sex lives as ‘average’. A further 18 percent thought that their sex life was ‘below average’ and 12 percent answered ‘significantly below average’.

Only six percent said that their sex lives were ‘significantly above average’.

READ ALSO: Parliament looking for new ways to get Danes to have kids

The sex lives of others
"It is widespread that people believe that the sex lives of others is better," Astrid Højgaard, a consultant doctor from the Sexology Centre at Aalborg University, explained to Politiken.

"Films, TV series, magazines, books and porn give people a distorted image of what normal sex and a normal sex life is."

READ ALSO: Sex campaign targets youngest school kids

Mostly men with the problem
The poll reveals that it is mostly men who feel unhappy under the sheets. Some 36 percent of men in relationships see their sex lives as ‘below average’ or ‘significantly below average’. For women, the figure was just 23 percent.

"Several different studies show that men in general have a greater appetite for sex than women in their lives," Højgaard told Politiken.

"They have more desire, and it can easily lead to the woman feeling pressured, while the man feels that his requirements are not being met. It is a built-in inequality between the sexes, which often creates frustrations."

Last month, Politiken wrote that sexless relationships are becoming more normal with 6 percent of Danish couples having sex just once a year or less.

 

 

 

 





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