Hot Buns serving burgers in hot pants

A burger restaurant where girls wear tank tops and jeans shorts is causing commotion

Don't expect to get a job at Hot Buns if you're a man – unless you look great in hot pants.

The controversial restaurant chain is looking for waitresses willing to serve burgers and milkshakes while wearing denim shorts.

"It's important that you are outgoing, good at making contact and are completely fine that your uniform will be denim shorts and a tank top," it says in the online job description.

Hot Buns is opening a three-floor restaurant on Gothersgade in Copenhagen in a few weeks. The concept is similar to the American restaurant chain Hooters, where waitresses tend to be voluptuous young girls in revealing outfits.

Uniforms are degrading
Women's rights group Dansk Kvindesamfund said the saucy Hot Buns uniform creates a demeaning view of women, and Socialdemokraterne's youth party (DSU) is also considering getting involved in the case. 

"Fast food normally makes you feel guilty, but this burger should make people feel extra guilty and leave a bad taste in the mouth," Camilla Schwalbe, the head of DSU, told Avisen newspaper.

Former Hot Buns girls also told Avisen that they had never seen boys work as waiters.

Tank top and hot pants
While it wasn't possible to get a comment from owner Mathias Kær, he told city guide AOK in February that the waitresses will be wearing their infamous uniforms in the new establishment on Gothersgade.

"Our beautiful girls will bring the uniform to Copenhagen. It consists of a tank top and hot pants," he said. 





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