More motorists being caught drug driving

Significant rise in number of drivers testing positive for drugs

The number of motorists in Denmark caught behind the wheel with drugs in their system has increased by as much as 233 percent from 2010 to 2013 according to new figures.

It has been revealed that 4307 drivers received a fine or were imprisoned for driving under the influence of drugs last year.

By comparison, only 1849 were caught for the same offence in 2010.

READ ALSO: Legal cannabis rejected by government

Hot spot around Christiania
In Copenhagen alone the police stopped 1445 motorists driving under the influence of narcotics.

More than 600 of those caught were driving in the vicinity of Christiania.

Allan Wadsworth-Hansen of the Copenhagen Police Traffic Department  described the problem. “Experience shows that it is particularly drivers affected by marijuana that drive around Christiania,” he said to Metroxpress.

READ ALSO: Traffic safety commission wants drink driving limit lowered 

'Narkometer'
Since the turn of the year traffic departments nationwide have been able to step up their efforts in stopping drug drivers with the use of a new controversial ‘narkometer’ tool.

“If we are in doubt if a person is affected by one or more drugs, then the ‘narkometer’ can reveal whether there are any illegal drugs in the body, and if so, which ones,” Allan Wadsworth-Hansen said.

On Wednesday, Copenhagen City Court sentenced a 23 year old man to four and a half years in prison for running down and killing a 46-year-old woman whilst under the influence of alcohol and drugs.





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