Parliament signs off on new sports deal

Funding will step up efforts to tackle doping in sports and gyms

A vast majority of parliament has agreed to a new plan on how to subsidise sports across the nation, the Ministry of Culture has revealed in a press release.

Among other things, the agreement further strengthens efforts to curtail doping, and Team Denmark will be given extra funding to continue the development of Danish talent.

“Danes do a lot of sport and exercise and they do it at sports clubs, in fitness centres and on the streets, and that’s something that I want to support along with parliament,” Marianne Jelved, the culture minister, said in a press release.

READ MORE: Copenhagen to spend 132 million kroner more on sport

Horse-related sports to suffer
The agreement will simplify the stream of subsidies to Danish sports so that Anti Doping Danmark, Sport Event Denmark and the sporting institute, Idrættens Analyseinstitut, receive their grants directly from the Culture Ministry and not via the sports organisations.

The agreement also means that Sport Event Danmark will become permanent and will be given 24 million kroner annually from 2015 to 2016 and 25 million kroner annually in 2017 and 2018.

Idrættens Analyseinstitut will be granted two million kroner in 2015, three million kroner in 2016 and four million kroner in 2017-2018.

The funds will be obtained by slashing 15-30 million kroner from horse-related sports over the next four years while the Danish Athletics Federation, sports advocates DGI and other organisations that receive allotment funds will give 12 million kroner annually to state-funded sporting priorities. 





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