A third of Danish men approve of torture

When it comes to torturing enemies, Danes share the views of South Koreans and Russians

Danish men are more inclined to accept torture than their female counterparts, according to a Yougov survey in Metroxpress.

Respondents were asked to what extent they agreed with the statement: "Torture is sometimes necessary and acceptable as a way to get hold of information that can protect the public." 

While only 17 percent of the women agreed, no less than 37 percent of the men supported the illegal methods.

Gender researcher not surprised
Kenneth Reinicke, an associate professor of gender studies at Roskilde University, is not surprised. 

"If the information is valid, men are more flexible and willing to compromise than women who are determined. It shows that men have a more pragmatic approach to war, where the end justifies the means," he told Metroxpress.

Human rights group alarmed
However, the findings that 27 percent of the Danish population approves of torture worried Helle Jacobsen, a campaign manager at Amnesty International. 

"I think it's an alarmingly high number. We signed the UN torture convention and I generally see Denmark as a country against torture. You can't have degrees of the ban," she said.

Chinese score high
When Amnesty International carried out a similar international survey, it showed that 75 percent of the Chinese were in favour of torture while only 12 percent supported it in Greece. Among the countries who have a similar degree of support for torture are South Korea and Russia.





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