Denmark’s first World War I museum opens

Modern technology and authentic objects portray the WWI period of 1914-1918

Prince Joachim was on hand to cut the barbed wire at the opening of Denmark’s first World War I museum at Mosede Fort near Karlslunde.

Combining modern technology with authentic objects from the WWI period of 1914-1918, the museum will portray how the Danes experienced the war as a neutral country,

”We don’t have a museum about WWI in this country, but they do in other nations,” Henriette Buus, museum head, told Videnskab.dk.

“The particularly interesting thing about this museum is that we tell the story from a completely neutral standpoint. It is an important war to convey because it changed Denmark forever.”

READ MORE: Museum selling Viking ships to the public

Forgotten war
Greve Council decided to renovate the century-old fort back in 2010 and it now stands at the ready to convey history via film, photos, authentic objects and an illustrated map that, among other things, shows a 40 km trench stretching from Køge to Roskilde.

“WWI is kind of the forgotten war, because people don’t know much about what actually happened,” Pernille Beckmann, the mayor of Greve Council, said. “It’s our responsibility to tell the history from this time.”





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