Hækkerup steps down as justice minister

Mette Frederiksen steps over from employment to replace her

The Helle Thorning-Schmidt government has been forced to make yet another ministerial change today following the news that the justice minister, Karen Hækkerup, is stepping down to take a position in the private sector.

The current employment minister, Mette Frederiksen, will take over as justice minister, while veteran politician Henrik Dam Kristensen will replace Frederiksen at the Employment Ministry.

“It's been three fantastic years in Helle's government,” Hækkerup said in a press release. “Helle is a brave and visionary prime minister who I am proud to have worked with.”

“We have come through on long-term solutions and significant improvements for lots of people, but now I'm saying goodbye because I've received an offer I could not turn down.”

READ MORE: Government to limit family reunification for refugees

Slamming the door shut
Hækkerup's offer comes in the form of the head of the agriculture and food product organisation Landbrug og Fødevarer – a position she will take over on October 20. She stated that she would not be returning to politics.

The departing minister, who has been a member of parliament since 2005 and first became a minister in 2011 when she assumed the reins as the social and integration minister, has been the justice minister since December 2013.

The latest round of ministerial musical chairs is the eighth reshuffle of Helle Thorning-Schmidt administration in just three years.





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