Chef’s son found guilty of animal cruelty

Camilla Plum’s son and his accomplice slaughtered a pony on a beach in 2013

Carl Plum, the son of noted chef Camilla Plum, has been found guilty of animal cruelty for first slitting the throat of a pony named Tarzan on Tisvildeleje Beach in northern Zealand in the summer of 2013, and then decapitating it.

Plum and a companion were convicted of violations of the Animal Welfare Act and the Weapons Act, along with the unlawful slaughter of an animal. 

The weapons conviction relates to the knife that was used to kill and behead the pony.

A deliberate act
The pony belonged to Camila Plum, who found its head in her garden and reported it to the police.

Both Plum and his accomplice were sentenced to 30 days in prison and ordered to pay court costs.

Plum was not present when her son's sentence was handed down.

READ MORE: Three charged with pony decapitation

Judge Torben Hvid said the three lay judges who assessed the case found that the killing of the pony was a deliberate act that the two suspects had committed in co-operation with one another.

“This was a carefully planned and co-operative project,” said the judge when passing judgement. “Tasks relating to the slaughter of this pony were broken down and planned.”

Defendants launch appeal
Hvid said the animal had endured "quite significant suffering for no particular reason”.

However, it was not recommended that Plum and his friend be forced to stay away from animals in the future.

“Once the sentence is served, there is no reason to believe they will do something similar again,” said Hvid. 

Both Plum and his co-defendant have already appealed against the verdict, which could take the case to the High Court.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.