Danish doctor cracks child obesity enigma

Paediatrician Jens-Christian Holm has an 80 percent success rate at making the kids normal again

Despite the number of overweight Danish children and young people more than tripling over the past 30 years, it has been almost impossible get the children to permanently lose weight. Until now.

Jens-Christian Holm, a paediatrician from Holbæk Hospital, has treated 1,900 children and young people aged 3-22, of which 80 percent have lost weight and retained a normal weight after treatment.

”It's easy enough getting the children to lose weight,” Holm told Metroxpress newspaper. ”The tough part is getting them to stay there.”

”But we can do it now with the vast majority of children, because we recognise, research and treat child obesity as a chronic illness.”

Holm and his department's work has featured on some of the BBC's international channels (Podcast: go 17:30 minutes in for the piece) and electronic platforms across most of the world this week.

READ MORE: Prenatal stress may affect children's health

Tailor-made changes
The Danish doctor hopes that paediatricians all over the world will adopt his department's ground-breaking results in the global battle against obesity among children and young people.

"We are naturally very happy and proud about our results,” Holm said. ”Obesity is very difficult for children to handle alone.”

"We work with a deep understanding of the hormonal processes, special pedagogy and 15-20 individually-tailored lifestyle changes for the children, but also for their families.”





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.