New firework rules make for a short display

You can only light up between December 27 and January 1

Many regard the build-up to Christmas and New Year as their favourite time of the year to shoot off some rockets at their neighbours or toss a few firecrackers at unsuspecting passers-by on the street.

But be careful this year because although you can start purchasing fireworks from December 15 (up until December 31), the new fireworks legislation dictates that they can only be lit between December 27 and January 1.

”It's still permitted to use fireworks on New Year's Eve and on January 1 until midnight,” the safety authorities Sikkerhedsstyrelsen wrote in a press release.

READ MORE: Two men arrested in explosives case

Six day window
Last year, firework lovers had all of December to purchase fireworks, and they were able to ignite their goods throughout December and part of January.

Many of the firework distributors find it odd that people can purchase their goods, but not use them unless it's in the six-day window leading up to New Year, but it helps that the new law eases rules concerning the storage of fireworks.


Fact box

The new rules regarding fireworks means that:

It's only legal to purchase fireworks from December 15-31

It's only legal to use fireworks from December 27-January 1

If you want to shoot off fireworks during a festive moment at some other time of the year, you must contact a pyrotechnician

Legal consumer fireworks are fitted with a number that can be checked at Sikkerhedsstyrelsen's website

A consumer is permitted to transport/store a maximum of 5 kilos (net explosive quantity) of fireworks in their cars/homes

As a consumer, you are not permitted to bring any fireworks into Denmark





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.