Danes marking 10-year tsunami anniversary

Disaster claimed many lives, including those of 46 Danes

Ten years ago, on December 26, a devastating tsunami hit Southeast Asia with disastrous consequences for countries bordering the Indian Ocean. The tsunami left hundreds of thousands dead or missing and affected people all over the world, including many Danes who were in the affected areas at the time or had relatives there.

To mark the anniversary, Helligaandskirken (located on Strøget) will be holding a memorial service on December 26 at 2pm for anyone who would like to join, including relatives and those who assisted with relief efforts.

The service is being prepared by priests Leif G Christensen and Susanne Steensgaard, who were sent to Phuket, Thailand's largest island, in the aftermath.

“The casualties were in the midst of chaos, treated and brought home, while a larger Danish rescue team from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs was sent to Thailand to assist rescue efforts,” the priests said in a statement. “Among them were police, forensic specialists, psychologists, priests and others. After weeks of searching it became clear, however, that 46 Danes had perished.”

Memorials in Asia
On the anniversary date, the Danish embassy in Thailand will be holding a small memorial in Khao Lak, north of Phuket, in co-operation with Norway. Søren Nutzhorn Hede, the consul in Phuket, and Kirsten Eistrup, the naval chaplain in Singapore, will represent the country.

The embassy has said that if there are any Danish relatives who expect to be in Phuket on the anniversary, they can contact the embassy in Bangkok.

In Indonesia, there will be a memorial service in the city of Banda Aceh on the island of Sumatra on December 26. Casper Klynge, the Danish ambassador to Indonesia, will be attending.





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