Government reveals rubbish reduction plan

72 initiatives to better utilise resources looking ahead to 2027

In a bid to reduce the amount of rubbish produced by companies and citizens in Denmark, the government has revealed a new prevention strategy that focuses on greener consumption.

The 72-initiative strategy (here in Danish) is part of the government's new 'Denmark without trash II' plan, which the environmental minister, Kirsten Brosbøl, unveiled this week. It will aim to better utilise resources looking ahead to 2027.

”In a world where resources are under pressure, the winners of the future are those who get more out of less,” Brosbøl said.

”Today, there are already many companies that reuse and recycle material, design products with longevity or launch business models that involve renting rather than owning. This is a development we need to embrace.”

READ MORE: Copenhagen not pissing about with keeping clean

Savings to be made
The 72 initiatives are spread out across five central areas: less food waste, construction waste, clothing and textile waste, electronics waste and packaging waste.

The minister referred to a report by Copenhagen Economics that showed that companies can improve their resource efficiency by 4.5 percent by using existing technology optimally. The savings are equivalent to about 9-19 kroner per labour hour.

The funds for the project will stem from existing funds earmarked for research, innovation and development, but another 25 million kroner has been set aside over the next three years.





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