A weekend of summer and then back to cold

Friday and Saturday will see temperatures approaching 25 degrees, before the cold slips back into place

If you’ve been looking forward to soaking up some Vitamin D and getting your tan on in the coming weeks, you’d better be quick.

Don’t be fooled by the sunny streak that has blessed Denmark over the past few days – after the weekend, it’s back to some cold again.

“The next few days will be very nice, with dry and sunny weather. Today and tomorrow will be around 15-20 degrees, and Friday will be around 22-23 degrees,” DMI meteorologist Mogens Rønnebek told Ekstra Bladet.

After that, it will begin to go downhill again.

Saturday – a mixed bag
Experts assert that mid-weekend will see a turn in the weather.

“Saturday will be changeable. It starts dry with some sunshine in most places, but during the day there will be rain and showers from the west. In the western part of the country, the temperature will be between 15 and 20 degrees, but in the southern and eastern parts, the temperature may reach 25 degrees,” said Rønnebæk.

According to the DMI website, the temperature in the Capital Region will reach 24 degrees on Saturday.

Back to cooler temperatures
And keeping in trend with the typical Danish summer, we can expect rain and high winds to plague our sun baking patterns, with cooler temperatures and unsettled conditions returning next week.

“It will be windy with a maximum of 15 degrees for most of next week,” said Rønnebæk.

“High summer is still a long way off unfortunately.”

 

 





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.