July music: Invasion of the pianists


Jamie Cullum & Tivolis Big Band

Fri July 3, 22:00; Harmonipavillonen, Tivoli; free adm with entry to gardens

Piano showman Jamie Cullum might look up to his former model wife, Sophie Dahl, by 20 cm, but there are few he looks up to in his genre right now.

He skillfully combines two music genres and can now rightfully call himself a jazz-pop musician.

But not only has he mastered the piano, he is a great entertainer whose shows are border-line legendary.

In his mostly improvised shows, Cullum does not only sing and play the piano, but also uses some guitar or drum elements, or, if he feels like it, might even tell a joke. (JK)


 

 Michel Camilo

(photo: Erinc Salor)
(photo: Erinc Salor)

 

Wed July 8, 20:00; Amager Bio; 415kr

Music obviously runs through the veins of Grammy-award winning, Dominican Republic-born star pianist Michel Camilo, as he has no less than nine uncles who are all also musicians.

Camilo himself started playing his first instrument at the age of nine, which was not the piano he would later master, but the accordion.

He took an education as a classic musician and played first for his country’s national orchestra and later for the BBC Symphony Orchestra.

He successfully produced his own records and today is among the top pianists of our time. He favours jazz, Latin and classical piano. (JK)


 

Elton John

(photo: Ernst Vikne)
(photo: Ernst Vikne)



Mon July 7, 21:00; Plænen, Tivoli; 500kr

Sir Elton John and his band once again do Copenhagen the honour of playing one of their memorable shows, this time under the open sky. Time to light a little candle in the wind. (JK)


 

Fire! Orchestra + The thing

(photo:  Jazzhouse.dk)
(photo: Jazzhouse.dk)

 

Sat July 11, 21:00; Copenhagen Jazzhouse; 240kr

Scandinavian forces are combining to provide a highlight of the Jazz Festival. Sweden’s Fire! Orchestra are joined by the Swedish-Norwegian bassist/drum trio The Thing. (JK)


 





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.