MIT opens its doors to Danish researchers

Agreement is part of a strategic focus, according to education and research minister

Denmark’s researchers will in the future be able to gain access to the absolute zenith of science and technology thanks to a new agreement between the research and innovation authority, Styrelsen for Forskning og Innovation, and the prestigious Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

The agreement will enable Danish PhD students – along with those with post docs in biology, biotechnology, chemistry and pharmaceutics – to sample one of the world’s top research environments.

“If Denmark is to maintain its strong position within research, it is essential that young Danish researchers connect with the best within their field and exchange knowledge for mutual benefit,” said the education and research minister, Esben Lunde Larsen.

“At the same time it is critical for Danish research environments to successfully transform and commercialise knowledge in co-operation with international players. The MIT co-op is an example of the strong strategic focus we have in the internationalisation of Danish research.”

READ MORE: DTU named the most innovative Nordic university

Nobel Prize machine
At MIT, the Danish researchers will gain access to the newest knowledge, world-class facilities and an entrepreneurial environment known for making scientific advances.

MIT, one of the elite universities in the world, was recently ranked first in the annual QS World University Rankings and among the top three most innovative universities in the world by Reuters.

The university has educated no less than 80 Nobel Prize winners since its conception in 1861.





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