Denmark unveils new aid package for Yemen

Situation is desperate as civil war continues to fester

The government has set aside 20 million kroner to assist in ongoing aid efforts in Yemen where the population is teetering on the edge of disaster.

The foreign minister, Kristian Jensen, announced the contribution yesterday in New York where he is participating in the 2015 United Nations Sustainable Development Summit.

“Yemen is on the cusp of a hunger epidemic and, according to the UN, it is the worst humanitarian catastrophe at the moment aside from Syria,” said Jensen.

“21 million people need help. The situation for the people of Yemen is desperate and it can destabilise the entire region, which already suffers from poverty, extremism and radicalisation.”

READ MORE: Denmark earmarks another 10 million for Yemen

Ravaged by civil war
Some 10 million kroner of the Danish aid will go to the UN food program WFP, which disperses food to the population, while the other 10 million is earmarked for the UN’s efforts to ensure there is clean drinking water, food and medical assistance in the country.

The latest contribution means Denmark has given over 63 million kroner in aid to Yemen in 2015. Aside from Denmark, the US, Norway, the Netherlands and the UK have also agreed to give aid.

The beleaguered nation is enduring a civil war and the UN estimates that over 21 million people require humanitarian aid.





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