Denmark close to landing extra sprat quota

Move to net an estimated extra 180 million kroner for the Danish fishing industry

The efforts of the environment and food minister, Eva Kjer Hansen, to get a larger quota for Denmark’s fishing industry have reportedly been a success.

According to a new proposal from the EU Commission, Denmark’s quota for sprat will be considerably increased by 110,000 tonnes in the North Sea in 2015. That’s an estimated extra 180 million kroner for the industry.

“There are loads of sprat in the North Sea, and I’ve fought hard in Brussels in order for Danish fishermen to be able to fish for more sprat already this year,” said Hansen.

“It looks to have been a success for the fishermen, the processing industry and the export of fish products. More fish means growth across the board in Denmark.”

READ MORE: Cod and plaice thriving in Danish waters

No pouting for pout
The EU Commission’s proposal, which requires the approval of the European Council, increases the EU sprat quota in the North Sea from 227,000 to 350,000 tonnes, with Denmark landing the lion’s share of the quota increase.

The quota increase decision was made due to research revealing that the sprat population in the North Sea is thriving like never before.

Furthermore, the EU Commission proposal also includes extending the fishing of Norway pout for an additional two months to the end of the year. The population was improved significantly after the herring populations in Skagerrak and Kattegat stabilised.

The news comes in the wake of cod and plaice numbers in the North Sea being at their highest levels since 1983.





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