Drenched Denmark still battling the drink

Some 63 billion litres of water in two days have been more than enough for parts of Jutland, with Holsterbro worst affected

Mid and western Jutland have borne the brunt of both Helga and Gorm, the most recent storms to hit Denmark. As high winds have wreaked havoc and some streams have overflowed in places, roads have been submerged and properties sandbagged in anticipation of flooding.

READ MORE: Flood warnings in central Jutland: Risk of Storå stream breaking its banks

Holstebro has endured some flooding, mostly as a result of the nearby Storå stream bursting its banks in places. And water levels are expected to rise a bit more today, before finally starting to fall.

“The good news is that the storm has moved on, but 63 billion litres of water have fallen in the area over two days, so we are still facing challenges,” meteorologist Thomas Mørk told DR Nyheder.

Slow improvement
Water levels along the Storå are at their highest for five years, and nearby residents and businesses spent the weekend sandbagging against flooding.

“We are in the middle of the stream’s reach,” explained Mogens Eliasen from Holstebro Fire and Rescue Watch to TV2 News. “More water is coming down from up-river, so it will take a few days before the water level falls again.”

Work goes on
Water broke through an emergency exit at the Buddy Holly discotheque  in central Holstebro last night and threatened the nearby music theatre.

“It was thought that the worst was over, but in central Holstebro floodwaters crashed into the Buddy Holly, and there is a risk that they will continue on to the Hotel Royal and Musikteatret,” said Helge Røjle a DR reporter at the scene.

About 50 people continue to work at the site this morning with additional pumps, help and equipment on the way from surrounding areas.





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