Denmark unveils new South Sudan strategy

Millions of people displaced in war-torn nation

The foreign minister, Kristian Jensen, has revealed a new strategy for Denmark’s continued engagement in South Sudan looking ahead to 2018.

The strategy focuses on encouraging peace, security and better living conditions for the millions of South Sudanese who are currently suffering due to the ongoing conflict in the east-African nation.

“Denmark has been a loyal supporter of the South Sudanese – even before they gained independence from Sudan in 2011, and it pleases me to announce Denmark’s continued support,” said Jensen.

“I take a strong position against the many gruesome acts and human rights breaches that the civilian population has endured. From the Danish side, we are working on improving the living conditions so the South Sudanese refugees can return home.”

READ MORE: Denmark to donate millions of dollars to help displaced people in Africa

Millions displaced
Denmark’s new strategy (here in Danish) includes development co-operation, humanitarian support and the sending of civilian and military personnel to South Sudan as part of the UN’s ongoing peacekeeping mission in the war-torn nation.

South Sudan gained independence from Sudan in 2011, but internal strife sparked a violent conflict in late 2013. Since then, over 2 million people have become internally displaced and more than 700,000 people have fled to neighbouring countries.

Denmark’s efforts from 2016-2018 are expected to cost 100 million kroner.





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