Copenhagen buses to go electric by 2020

City mayor questions the increased taxes that the new vehicles must pay

Copenhagen’s buses will make the switch from diesel to electric when current bus contracts expire in 2019.

The move is expected to help the city mayor, Frank Jensen, in his push for a carbon-neutral Copenhagen by 2025.

A total of 385 buses are expected to be replaced covering 33 bus lines.

“Completely wrong”
The electric buses are expected to cost around 68 million kroner more per year than the current diesel buses.

A significant amount of this cost is due to the high rate of electricity tax on buses, which is three times the amount payable on fuel tax.

“It is absurd that the current tax policies are favouring diesel buses rather than electricity,” Frank Jensen told Politiken.

“And it is completely wrong, the buses in public transport must pay 200 times more electricity tax than the national rail operator does.”

 





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