Copenhageners would welcome more tourists

95 percent of capital’s residents keen on more visitors

A new survey compiled by the Centre of Expertise Leisure, Tourism & Hospitality (CELTH) in six European cities has revealed that the citizens of Copenhagen are the least irked by tourism.

In fact, nearly all – a whopping 95 percent – are open to more tourists coming and having a gander at the Little Mermaid and the other sights and sounds of the Danish capital.

“Tourism is something that affects us collectively, so it’s important for us as a tourism organisation to understand how Copenhageners regard tourism,” said Mikkel Aarø-Hansen, the head of Wonderful Copenhagen.

“Moreover, the co-operation in the survey allows us to learn from the experiences of other cities. This is knowledge we can work further with and in the new strategy for tourism in the capital, which we are currently composing.”

READ MORE: Copenhagen launches new massive waterfront tourism trail

On the rise
According to the survey – which also included Berlin, Munich, Barcelona, Amsterdam and Lisbon – 79 percent of Copenhageners contended that, without reservations, there was space for more tourists in the city, while 16 percent argued there was only space for more tourists outside the peak season.

Compared to the five other cities, Copenhagen has the least tourism measured in annual overnight hotel stays, but tourism has increased by over 53 percent in the Danish capital since 2009.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.