Asylum-seeker numbers still low in Denmark

But Dansk Folkeparti wants further measures imposed

The flow of people seeking asylum in Denmark continues to remain reasonably low compared to last year, according to the latest figures from the Immigration and Integration Ministry.

Last week, just 52 people applied for asylum in Denmark, taking the total for 2016 to 5,601 thus far – a far cry from the 800 or so who sought asylum on a weekly basis this time last year.

In fact, over 21,000 people sought asylum in Denmark last year as the influx of refugees fleeing conflicts in Syria, Iraq and parts of Africa really gathered momentum.

Of the 52 who sought asylum last week, 11 were from Syria, four from Afghanistan, four from Iraq, and the remaining 33 from other nations.

READ MORE: Number of asylum seekers coming to Denmark significantly in decline

DF not done
Despite the dwindling figures, asylum has once again found itself on the political agenda as Dansk Folkeparti (DF) has brought immigration policy into the ongoing budget negotiations for 2017.

DF wants to make it possible to reject asylum-seekers at the Danish border and send them to a country deemed safe enough for them to live in, such as Germany.

The immigration and integration minister, Inger Støjberg, has indicated that she is not prepared to make that demand part of the budget negotiations.





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