Government secures new dementia strategy

470 million kroner to lift Denmark’s dementia efforts looking ahead to 2025

The minister for the elderly, Thyra Frank, and the health minister, Ellen Trane Nørby, have revealed the government’s new 470 million kroner dementia plan.

The new strategy consists of three overall goals aimed at improving Denmark’s dementia efforts looking ahead to 2025.

“I’m very pleased about the agreement as never before has such a large amount been set aside for dementia,” said Frank.

“Dementia is a terrible disease that already affects many thousands of Danes today, and we expect it will hit even more people in Denmark in the coming years.”

READ MORE: Denmark opens its first village for dementia sufferers

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The new strategy eyes a future Denmark made up of 98 ‘dementia-friendly’ municipalities.

It has three key points: accounting for every sufferer in the country, giving a specific diagnosis to at least 80 percent of them, and reducing the use of anti-psychotic medication by 50 percent by 2025.

Dementia has found itself more under the microscope in Denmark recently.

Last month, the town of Svendborg on Funen opened the country’s first village for residents suffering with dementia.

And in September, the government unveiled a new action plan aimed at helping people suffering from dementia to “live a dignified and secure life in Denmark”.





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