Alcohol involved in deadly ship collision

Swedish authorities have arrested two men after their ship inexplicably turned and collided with the Danish barge ‘Karin Høj’

Alcohol may have been a contributing factor to the fatal collision involving a British cargo vessel and a Danish barge in Swedish waters earlier this week.

According to the Swedish Coastguard, two members of the crew of the British ship, the ‘Scot Carrier’, had alcohol in the blood and have been arrested after colliding with the Danish vessel, the ‘Karin Høj’.

One of the men arrested has since been released.

“In line with standard procedures, it is further understood that all crew members of the ‘Scot Carrier’ were tested for drugs and alcohol with two crew members exceeding the Swedish legal limit for alcohol,” confirmed Scotline, the operators of the British vessel.

Hit-and-run job?
The collision, which occurred northwest of Bornholm in the early hours of December 13,
led to the ‘Karin Høj’ capsizing.

Meanwhile, the British vessel continued on its way for 25 minutes after the collision before turning back.

It has been confirmed that one Danish sailor died in the collision, while a second remains missing. 

The two men arrested in wake of the incident are a Croatian national and a British citizen.





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