Copenhagen Airport hampered by queue chaos

Long waiting times going through security checkpoints has the airport asking passengers to arrive earlier than normal

Passengers flying out for a short holiday last weekend were greeted by immense queues stretching all the way back to the Metro. 

The airport is struggling to train and hire new staff after the Corona Crisis, leading to a shortage of staff in the security checkpoints. 

As of Tuesday morning, the waiting time in security was at 44-47 minutes, according to the airport website. 

“There are many departing passengers from the airport at the moment. This can lead to longer waiting times than usual. Come to the airport early and make sure you bring the necessary travel documents,” the airport wrote.

READ ALSO: SAS cancels thousands of flights this summer

Queues on the horizon
The long waiting times will likely continue, especially during the upcoming long weekends extended by bank holidays. 

For instance, the airport expects some 70,000 passengers to pass through during the Ascension Day weekend. 

The airport advises passengers to arrive two hours before trips to destinations in Europe and three hours for travel outside Europe.

Check out the airport’s ‘Get off to a good start’ guide here (in English).





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