Accepting ‘normalisation’ bid, Christiania reopens

Commune reopens to public after announcing it will pay to occupy disused naval base

At noon today, hundreds of protestors broke through the barricades blocking entry into Christiania, as they demanded that the semi-autonomous community end its three-day lockout.

The end of the self-imposed isolation came as residents announced they had decided to enter into negotiations on a joint purchase of the state-owned property they have occupied since the 1970s.

“We have collectively decided to say yes to redeeming the whole of Christiania, so it can continue to be yours and mine – absolutely free,” Thomas Ertmann, a Christiania spokesperson, said.

According to Ertmann, the alternative was a closed and torn down Christiania.

The peaceful demonstrators were met by cheering residents who handed out flowers to those coming in. Inside, the atmosphere was one of celebration as residents and visitors enjoyed fine weather and live music.

The demonstrators had congregated at Christianshavn Torv square earlier in the day and walked the short distance to Christiania with flags and signs bearing messages of support for the self-styled freetown.

The re-opening of Christiania came after residents on Wednesday erected barricades around the 40-hecatre disused naval base.

By erecting the barricades, the residents sought to keep out visitors as it contemplated the governmentÂ’s ultimatum that the residents of the squatter colony purchase the property or have the state take it over.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.