Search for missing woman goes international

Police still have no lead on mother who disappeared from Copenhagen last week

Despite widespread media coverage and tip-offs from the public, police still have no clue what happened to Jeanett Rask Thomas, a 48-year-old woman who disappeared from her home on Ægirsgade Street in the Nørrebro neighbourhood last Friday.

Police have therefore decided to broaden their search beyond DenmarkÂ’s borders.

Thomas has a husband and two sons aged 13 and 18. She was last seen on Friday afternoon when she left home for the high street Strøget to cash in a gift card at the Arnold Busck bookstore.

She said she might eat a shawarma afterwards, before returning home. However, she never came back. Thomas’s mobile phone and cash card were found at home.

Copenhagen police have interviewed ThomasÂ’s family members, friends and acquaintances, and have searched for her at addresses where she is known to have a connection.

Based on the interviews, police report there are indications that Thomas may have been depressed in the time leading up to her disappearance.

“There is nothing to suggest that Jeanett Rask Thomas has fallen victim to a crime, but we cannot rule that out either,” said police inspector Youssef Lharraki of the Bellahøj police station.

Police are asking the public to call 114 with any clues as to ThomasÂ’s whereabouts. People are also asked to keep an eye out for her in parks, cellars and outbuildings.





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