Discover the real Latin America on screen

LATIN AMERICA is a region of the world in rapid transition, following the fall of many dictatorial regimes in the 1980s and the ensuing wave of democratisation. This has resulted in a blossoming film culture, which both looks back to the periods of dictatorship, examining problems such as poverty, violence and drugs – but also addresses new, more universal themes.

So join us and embark on  a cinematic journey through the colourful and diverse continent by attending the Latin American Film Festival 2012 at Cinemateket.  Of course, there is no such thing as a single Latin American film culture – it’s home to a rich and highly diverse range of film cultures. But despite their diversity, a common feature of all the films is the willingness to discuss culture and social change.

Each participating country – Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Mexico, Cuba, Chili and Venezuela – has its own night, consisting of a film screening, after which there will be wine and tapas, generously provided by the respective embassies.

The Chilean biopic film Teresa and the Venezuelan selection Venezzia describe love made impossible by social barriers. The Brazilian film, A Dog’s Will, and the Argentinian selection, A Chinese Take-Away, take a somewhat humorous view on reality, while Ella is a colourful portrait of Cuban women. The Mexican film Spiral shows how migration affects the ones left behind.

Bolivia kicks off the festival with Voices from Bolivia, which describes the contrasts between quiet life in a mountain village and the lively turmoil that emerges when people come from far and near to attend the annual market fair. Berlinske rated the film with five out of six starts and described it as “a fine piece of documentary”. Check Cinemateket’s website for the full programme. Tickets are also available on their website.

Latin American Film Festival at Cinemateket

Stars Wed, ends 13 June

Films start at 19:00
Tickets: 65kr
www.dfi.dk

 





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