Police conclude Folkets Park attack investigation

Witnesses say that the attack was carried out by 10-12 individuals, but police say there will be no further arrests

Despite witness reports that the May attack against four Danish tourists in Nørrebro’s Folkets Park was carried out by upwards of a dozen people, Copenhagen Police have now concluded an investigation that resulted in the arrest of just one 16-year-old boy.

Commissioner Knud Hvass of the Copenhagen Police told Politiken newspaper that no more arrests were expected and that “it has been hard to work out there [in Folkets Park].”

“Those involved haven’t been willing to explain what happened, so it hasn’t been that easy to figure out who participated in [the attack],” Hvass told Politiken. “But we believe that we have the guy who carried out the stabbing.”

The attack occurred in May, when four visitors from Jutland where in Copenhagen to attend a concert. They got lost and found themselves in Folkets Park, which is known for its open-air drug trade and has a history of violence including conflicts between local gang Blågårdsbanden and the Hells Angels.

As the four Jutland residents drove through Nørrebro, a group of 10-12 men surrounded the car and demanded to know if those inside were members of AK81, a support group for the Hells Angels.

When one of the men in the car responded “What if we are?”, they were pulled from their car and attacked. A 22-year-old man was stabbed three times in the stomach, resulting in internal bleeding and a collapsed lung.

A local Nørrebro business owner, however, told The Copenhagen Post that the passengers in the car were displaying provocative and aggressive behaviour before the attack occurred.

Despite the reports of a large group involved in the attack, police now consider the case closed. The 16-year-old will be indicted on an attempted murder charge.





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