US Embassy in Denmark “aware” after Libyan attacks

American-made film about the prophet Mohammed leads to violence and deaths at US consulates

Robert Kerr, the public affairs officer at the US Embassy in Copenhagen, said that the embassy was practising what he called “common sense [and] situational awareness at this point” after Christopher Stevens, the US ambassador to Libya, was killed when Libyan militants stormed the US consulate in Benghazi on Tuesday.

Two other US State Department employees were also killed when attackers stormed the consulate, angry about an American-made film that depicts the prophet Mohammed as a fraud and womaniser.

Anger over the film also provoked protests in Cairo on Tuesday. Demonstrators climbed the walls of the US embassy there, pulled down the American flag and replaced it with a black flag.





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