Inside this week | Halfway through Ian Poulter’s backswing

It pains me to say this, given that it pretty much pays my salary every month, but the advertising industry leaves a lot to be desired.

Where on earth do these rabid maniacs get the impression that annoying potential customers is the best policy? Like that pop-up of the wrinkly whose secrets are going to bring down the skincare industry. Great, good luck with that, weird looking woman, but given that your interruption means I’m going to have to retype my Facebook password for the fifth time today, do you really think I’m going to ever patronise your company?

But that pales in comparison with automated TV commercials. During their Ryder Cup coverage on Sunday night, TV3 Puls, part of Viasat (the official Swansea City club channel), went for one of their breaks during a golfer’s backswing. And it wasn’t any backswing, it was Ian Poulter’s approach to the final green over two massive trees with the whole of the tournament hinging on the outcome.

Which kind of leads me to Music Around, a London-themed classical music festival in both Copenhagen and southern Sweden over the next ten days. If you’re a regular visitor to our website, you might have seen its advert exactly in the place where the most recent Reader Comments are normally listed. Some of you have probably already seen the ad hundreds of times, with increasing annoyance, vowing to not only steer clear, but to verbally abuse anyone carrying a musical instrument case on public transport.

Be assured. This is not a cunning ploy to make you drink the waters of Music Around until you are drowning in its pleasures, hypnotised into attending every single concert. It is simply an ongoing technical problem. In the meantime, please don’t hold it against the festival. While the Brits might be third division when it comes to classical music, the London theme brings with it a certain degree of fun not normally seen in the genre.

Beyond that, is there a lot going on? Well, the ladies will love (shopping for shoes and the Femina Messe), and, there’s a chance to win two tickets to November’s Sensation. So kind of.

We promise, the competition won’t involve you having to read an ad. And no, the answer isn’t white.





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