Red postboxes retreat from Denmark’s streets

The increase of email use in Denmark means that the postman’s days are numbered

Post Danmark, the nation’s postal service, is set to scale back on its services after the autumn, following the decrease in conventional mail being sent around the country.

That also means that Denmark’s iconic red postbox is set to suffer as a result, with 1,500 boxes set to taken down in the near future.

“The amount of post being mailed in letter form has halved in the last ten years, and in that time we haven’t changed anything,” the head of distribution for Post Danmark, Martin von Horsten, said. “Therefore, we’re taking action and sadly that means scaling back on the amount of red boxes around.”

In addition, the post boxes left standing will be emptied less frequently than they currently are, which is hoped to increase efficiency while cutting costs at the same time.

“Even though the pick-up times will be essentially halved, the remaining boxes will be strategically placed and checked to ensure that when there is post to be sent and delivered, it’s effectively done in larger quantities,” von Horsten said.

While the move is an attempt to adapt to modern day life, it doesn’t completely neglect those who are nostalgic for the old fashioned method of keeping in contact. Post Danmark will be encouraging people to directly hand their mail to the postman, just like the good old days, as he makes his rounds.

Otherwise, you will be able to find out where the closest post box is to you by going on Post Danmark’s website, and clicking on the icon marked “Fnd Postkassen”.

This latest move follows a previous decision made back in May of this year to start closing down conventional post offices around the country and replacing them with smaller offices located in supermarkets, which in turn means longer opening hours.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.