Marianne Jelved named new culture minister

The veteran MP takes over from fellow Radikale member Uffe Elbæk, who stepped down amid nepotism allegations yesterday

Government coalition party Radikale has announced that Marianne Jelved will replace her fellow party member Uffe Elbæk as the culture minister. 

Following the announcement, Jelved, an MP since 1987, told Politiken newspaper that she was looking forward to working in her new position.

"I think that this is a very exciting development and assignment," she said. "I feel sorry for Uffe Elbæk, that is for sure. But when Margrethe [Vestager] asked if I would take over, I thought about it for a few minutes because it is quite the leap and I am happy where I am now. But Margrethe said it in the right way, and I ended up saying yes."

Vestager, the nation's finance minister in addition to being Radikale's leader, took to Twitter to welcome Jelved to the cabinet. 

"Marianne is back. Welcome to the team!" Vestager wrote.

The 69-year-old Jelved takes over as culture minister just a day after Elbæk stepped down following mounting criticism of his decision to hold repeated events at the art school where his husband was employed.

He wrote on Facebook that he was happy about Jelved's selection.

"It is the coolest choice in the world (Margrethe, you are so good!)," the now-former minister wrote. "This is very good for cultural live, for the ministry and for all of my (former) colleagues."

Ritzau news bureau reports that Jelved will have an audience with Queen Margrethe at 1pm today before taking over the reins at the Culture Ministry. 





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