New law to give lesbian couples equal parental rights

LGBT Danmark hails proposed legislation as a pioneering step in social equality

New legislation is being set in place to grant lesbian couples the same parental rights as heterosexual couples.

Current regulations dictate that if a lesbian is artificially inseminated by an unknown donor, her partner needs to apply for a so-called ‘second parent adoption’ in order to be legally recognised as a parent. Alternatively, if the insemination is done with a known sperm donor, then the partner of the impregnated mother has to wait two and a half years before applying for adoption.

“The current laws are overly bureaucratic and unnecessary,” Karen Hækkerup (Socialdemokraterne), the minister of integration, told Politiken newspaper. “We need to think about the interests of the child, and make sure that he or she gets the kind of care they deserve after birth.”

If the new law proposal come into practise, lesbian couples would be granted automatic legal guardianship if the child is conceived through artificial insemination. In cases in which the semen of a known donor is used, the parental rights would have be to negotiated between all involved parties before legal ownership of the child is established.

Søren Laursen, a spokesperson for LGBT Danmark, was delighted to hear about the latest developments and hailed Denmark as a pioneer of social equality.

“I’m sure other countries will soon follow suit,” Laursen told Politiken. “This is a real breakthrough in family values. We’ve finally managed to break out of a world in which parental guardianship is exclusively restricted to heterosexual couples. Now gays and lesbians can finally be granted the same rights.”

The government, which will submit the proposal forward for further consultation, already appears to have the majority support needed for the new law to be passed. 





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.