Universities fined for having too many foreign students

Danish universities have to pay up for not adhering to regulations regarding the balance of exchange students

Danish universities have to pay fines totalling 97.5 million kroner for accepting more foreign exchange students than they have sent abroad, according to freesheet metroXpress. The fines stem from the universities having broken regulations that state that the number of incoming foreign students must equal the number of Danish students that go to foreign universities. 

“The goal is to get more Danish students to go out on foreign exchange”, the minister of higher education, Morten Østergaard (Radikale), told metroXpress.

Kristian Thorn, the deputy rector of Aarhus University, said that the punishment is self-defeating.

"It is very inexpedient that we are being punished for attracting students from abroad when the national ambition is to make Danish universities more international," Thorn told metroXpress. "Foreign students add great value to our universities and to the study environment.”  

Aarhus University is facing a fine of ten million kroner.

Emilie Normann, the head of international affairs at Aalborg University, agreed with Thorn.

“It is important to accept international students," she said. "It is very frustrating that we must now limit the number we can admit because there has to be a balance.”

Østergaard admits that he is now considering revising the regulations.

“I’m currently considering if this is the right way to achieve our goals,” he said. 





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.