Microsoft part of ambitious building project in Lyngby

The construction plans are expected to help Lyngby become a leading science and university hub by 2020

Lyngby-Taarbæk Council has revealed plans for a considerable residential and commercial complex to be constructed in Lyngby city centre.

The plans are being made in close co-operation with international software conglomerate Microsoft and pension fund Danica Pension.

The complex, which will house Microsoft Danmark’s new headquarters, will be a cornerstone of the council’s aspirations to become a ‘knowledge city’ (vidensby) by 2020.

Lyngby-Taarbæk’s Vidensby 2020 vision is geared towards creating a greater connection between businesses, the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), other educational institutions, the housing sector and the council.

“Even before the establishment of the Vidensby partnership, we had a vision of a project like this,” Claus Nielsen, the head of Vidensbyen 2020 and the dean of DTU, said in a council press release. “Everyone involved entered the project yearning for a physical realisation of our goals – to attract more knowledge-based businesses, and create substantially-improved housing opportunities for researchers and students in a vibrant international city atmosphere.”

The new construction plans centre on a 16,350 square metre plot in the middle of Lyngby on Kanalvej that the council sold to Danica Pension after a bidding process. The project will cost the investors about 1.2 billion kroner and construction will commence sometime this year and stretch to 2016.

Although plans to develop the area have been discussed for years, the goal is for Lyngby to become one of northern Europe’s leading science and university cities by the year 2020.

“The development of Kanalvej has been a council target since 2010,” Simon Pihl Sørensen, the vice-mayor of Lyngby-Taarbæk Council, said in the press release. "This is a clear example that the city and the university are becoming integrated.”

Additionally, the project includes the building of around 400 residential spaces, 1,000 work places and about 800 parking spots.





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