Netto enforces headscarf ban for employees

Woman recently told not to apply because of her headscarf, but Supreme Court ruled in 2005 that Netto’s parent company was entitled to its ban

A 26-year-old Muslim was told not to apply for a job at Netto because she wears a head scarf, reports Fyens Stiftidende.

Nada Fraije is an unemployed social worker from Odense who recently approached Netto about the possibility of a work placement.

But a Netto representative told her not to bother as its parent company, Dansk Supermarked, has for the past ten years forbidden employees who interact with customers from wearing anything on their heads, unless it was necessary for hygiene purposes.

The Supreme Court ruled in 2005 that Dansk Supermarked was entitled to set the dress code and Dansk Supermarked have stated that employees without contact with customers are allowed to wear head scarves.





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