Little to go on for police investigating unidentified bodies

Discovery of body this morning is second in recent days. No connection is suspected, but police are still seeking identities and causes of death

Police in Copenhagen are seeking to determine the identity of a body found early this morning at Copenhagen's Amager Strandpark beach. 

Neither the woman's identity nor the cause of death were immediately apparent. Investigators are hoping that once they establish the woman's age, they will be able to determine whether she had been reported missing.

“She was wearing normal clothes and was holding a bag. But she didn't have any ID and we now have to find out who she is,” Kim Nicholsen, of the Copenhagen Police, told the Ritzau news bureau.

The body is the second in recent days to be discovered in the Greater Copenhagen area. 

On Monday, a decomposed male body was found behind the psychiatric emergency facility in Hillerød. An autopsy performed yesterday established that the man was between 50 and 60 years old at the time of death.

The police estimate that he has been dead for a year. They do not suspect foul play.

”There are no signs that the man was a victim of a crime,” Morten Riisager-Pedersen, a deputy superintendent with the North Zealand Police, told Ritzau.

The man is believed to be a missing northern Zealand man.





  • How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    How internationals can benefit from joining trade unions

    Being part of a trade union is a long-established norm for Danes. But many internationals do not join unions – instead enduring workers’ rights violations. Find out how joining a union could benefit you, and how to go about it.

  • Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals in Denmark rarely join a trade union

    Internationals are overrepresented in the lowest-paid fields of agriculture, transport, cleaning, hotels and restaurants, and construction – industries that classically lack collective agreements. A new analysis from the Workers’ Union’s Business Council suggests that internationals rarely join trade unions – but if they did, it would generate better industry standards.

  • Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    Novo Nordisk overtakes LEGO as the most desirable future workplace amongst university students

    The numbers are especially striking amongst the 3,477 business and economics students polled, of whom 31 percent elected Novo Nordisk as their favorite, compared with 20 percent last year.