Screws, bolts and glue to slow down number plate thefts

Threefold rise in thefts sparks law requiring car owners to screw or glue number plates to vehicle

Last year, over 20,000 motorists had the number plates stolen from their vehicles. Thieves use the plates to drive illegally or use vehicles with stolen plates during other crimes. The government has introduced a requirement that number plates must be fastened to the vehicle with at least two screws or bolts. A plastic cap then must be glued over the top of the hardware.

“We are making it harder to steal plates,” the justice minister, Morten Bødskov (Socialdemokraterne), told DR News. “It will help car owners and make it harder for criminals to get their hands on stolen number plates which they use to commit other crimes.”

Justice Ministry figures show the number of reported thefts of number plates has more than tripled in just six years.

In 2012, 21,507 plates were reported stolen compared with just 6,567 in 2006.

The new law takes effect in November 2015. Bodskøv estimated it would cost motorists between 200 and 500 kroner to have the number plates properly mounted by a repair shop. Replacing lost or stolen plates costs 1,200 kroner.

Auto association FDM supported the law and motorists seem to think it a good idea, despite the installation cost.

“Too many plates are getting stolen, so securing them is a good idea,” motorist Janne Schubert told DR News.





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