Driest summer of the millennium isn’t over yet

This summer is on pace to see the least amount in 13 years, and an Indian summer may still be on its way

We might be dealing with a on-again, off-again relationship with the rain gods at the moment, but there is no need to take out the winter parkas just yet, as temperatures are said to stay around the 20-25 degree mark for a while longer now. 

“I would say that the really warm, very sunny days are coming to an end, but the temperatures will stay good for a while longer,” Herdis Damberg, of national meteorology institute DMI said. “Over the weekend we should see good weather that will continue into next week.”

It probably hasn’t gone unnoticed that until our current cloudy predicament the summer has been better than the norm, and the facts speak for themselves. 

This summer’s rainfall stands at 117 millimetres compared to a rotten 257 for last summer and a horrifying 321 for the summer of 2011, the second wettest summer in history. In fact, if things go according to plan, this summer is set to be the nation's driest in thirteen years as Denmark has had above average rainfall each year since 2000 when the rainfall stood at 146 millimetres. The average summer rainfall is 188 millimetres. 

“Things are set to improve gradually over the next week and when we get to the end of the month, things look quite nice. So there is every possibility that we will have an Indian summer this year,” Damberg said.

The prediction should come as a sigh of relief for all those hoping to let the sweaters, coats and rain boots remain in the closet. 





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