Mixed netball’s super Saturday: opposite sexes, shared objective

Once we’ve left school, busy schedules, kids and other adult responsibilities drastically reduce the amount of competitive sport we take part in. Running around The Lakes or going to the gym can become tiresome, and as the summer months draw to a close, the Danish weather makes it increasingly difficult to motivate yourself.

 

But there is no substitute for competitive team sport, and one club that has taken this message to heart is Copenhagen Netball Club. This week, after months of hard training, the club will host an international tournament in which two teams from Copenhagen will face off against teams from Stockholm, Zurich, Paris and Geneva.

 

According to the event organisers, the tournament aims to “showcase the high level of co-operation going on between relatively new netball clubs established by expats in Europe”. Additionally, it will also give spectators a chance to see some sporting co-operation between the sexes, as all the teams are mixed.

 

The club, in the absence of a national netball body in Denmark, is charged with the responsibility of growing and developing netball in Denmark. It welcomes men and women, Danes and expats alike. Its activities extend beyond training and also include summer music festivals, pub crawls and BBQs.

 

If you are a curious potential recruit or just keen to get behind your city, the tournament will take place on Saturday at Bellahøj Hallerne (Bellahøjvej 1-3, Brønshøj). After a welcome from the club’s president Michael Bryrup at 9:30am, the games begin at 10am and continue throughout the day with the final taking place at 4:15pm. It is free admission and there will be a canteen open, to buy snacks and drinks all day.





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