The World Cup dream lives on in Yerevan

There’s still much to do, but a second-half penalty by Daniel Agger has kept Denmark’s hopes to qualify for the 2014 World Cup alive

Danish hopes to reach the 2014 World Cup in Brazil remained intact after a narrow 1-0 win over Armenia in Yerevan tonight.

Embattled coach Morten Olsen and his boys had been severely criticised for their performances recently, but dominated throughout and were rewarded with a game-winning penalty twenty minutes from time.

The penalty was won after young sub Viktor Fischer produced a moment of brilliance out of nothing. After skinning one defender near the touch-line, Fischer poked the ball away from another defender, who clattered the youngster, giving away the spot-kick.

Captain Daniel Agger stepped up and coolly slotted the penalty home to hand the Danes the three points needed to stave off World Cup qualification elimination.

For the moment at least, the ugly memories of the Armenian defeat in Copenhagen had vanished. So had Olsen's ill-advised comparisons the day before.

The win moves the Danes up to 12 points and temporarily into third place in the group behind leaders Italy and second-placed Bulgaria, who retained their one-point lead this evening by beating Malta 2-1.

The Czech Republic, meanwhile, will draw level with Denmark on points should they win in Italy. Heading into the second half, they are leading 1-0.

The result means that Denmark still have a chance of making the play-offs for the World Cup in Brazil next year if they manage to beat Italy and Malta in their final two games next month.

 





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