How dinner for couples can lead to friends for life

A new website hopes to do for couples what online dating services and social-networking sites do for singles

Whoever said two is company, but three’s a crowd forgot how three is only one short of four – an infinitely better number than two if you want to have fun around a table. 

And nobody knows this better than Mie Münster-Swendsen, the founder of Dinner4Couples.com, which she launched in August with the aim to make the process of finding and becoming friends with like-minded couples easier. It’s a concept that the website founder and former wedding planner believes there is a definite niche market for in Denmark, both among the natives and the international community.  

“I hear from many couples who are either the first of their friends to have kids, or the last,” she explained. “They would love to meet new people who know their lifestyle and empathise with them.”

Neglected needs  

“I’ve often wondered why there weren’t any offers like this for couples,” Münster-Swendsen continued. 

“Couples often forget to nurture their relationship and instead spend their time on the kids, separate interests or separate friends. With Dinner4Couples, I want to give them the opportunity to have a great evening together and experience something new together.”

The service is not solely limited to Danes. 

“It is also for couples who have recently moved to Copenhagen and have left their friends back home” she said. 

“They can use these dinner events to expand their social circles locally.”

Great for new arrivals 

Newly-arrived couples often have to overcome a whole host of stresses and potential stumbling blocks, and unfortunately, making new friends is often low on their list of priorities. However, Dinner4Couples.com hopes to address this.

The website follows a similar format to singles dating websites, but is exclusively for dining. This, Münster-Swendsen explained, allows it to claim that it is a service “not seen before in Denmark – or anywhere else”.

After creating a free profile, the website offers a range of dining evenings in collaboration with an assortment of good restaurants around town for a fee of between 495-1,995 kroner per couple (dependent on the restaurant). 

Couples are able to list their interests and choose the type of pair they would like to meet according to a diverse range of categories listed on the website. Particularly pertinent for expats are the sections ‘Friends across borders’, which is aimed at people from different regions in Denmark and abroad; ‘International or semi-international’, which is aimed at couples of which at least one partner is not Danish; and ‘Newcomers’ – those who have recently arrived in Denmark.

If you and your better half would like to join, see www.dinner4couples.com for more details. The next scheduled dinner is on November 7.





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