Autism schools’ profits a concern for city

Two privately run schools specialising in teaching students with autism and similar disorders will be investigated by the city after it was revealed that they have turned multi-million kroner profits each year since 2008.

The city pays the schools as much as 50,000 kroner per student each year.

The city underscored that turning a profit was not illegal, but it was concerned the schools were doing so at the expense of special-needs children.

“It’s completely inappropriate to make money off children that need extra help,” said Tobias Børner Strax, a city official. Most other special-needs schools are operated by non-profit organisations. 

Politiken

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