City cites wrong law in rejecting tax complaint

Copenhagen officials rejected a complaint by a group of homeowners earlier this year over their property tax assessment by citing a law that did not apply to the situation.

The homeowners in the Valby district, saw their assessments rise by as much as 32,000 kroner annually, and the city said the increases were due to a law passed by parliament allowing tax increases on properties that previously had been under-assessed.

Although the law does exist, according to lawyers for the homeowners, the city made an “embarrassing mistake” by misinterpreting it and incorrectly applying it to the case of the homeowners.

Tim Henriksen, a city tax official, said the error was likely a result of the “jumble of information” the council receives.

After being told that the deadline for appealing had passed, the homeowners were told that they could appeal, but not until 2016, when a new property tax assessment system is in place.

Politiken

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