UPDATE: All missing Danes now accounted for in the Philippines

The Foreign Ministry has reason to believe that the remaining missing three Danes are on three separate islands

UPDATE, 12:31: According to a press release from the Foreign Ministry, the three remaining Danes that were unaccounted for in the Philippines have now been found. The Danish consulate in Manilla successfully made contact with the remaining three last night and all three are reported as being in good health.

ORIGINAL, 10:35: Most of the Danes who have been missing since Typhoon Haiyan decimated the Philippines on November 8 have been safely found, according to the Foreign Ministry, but three still remain unaccounted for.

According to the Foreign Ministry’s service centre, Udenrigsministeriets Borgerservice, five Danes were located yesterday and all are doing well under the circumstances.

Udenrigsministeriets Borgerservice did not know whether the five would return to Denmark or remain in the Philippines. The focus has now shifted to finding the last three missing Danes through local authorities, aid organisations and other channels.

“The search team is now concentrating on the last three people,” Ole Egberg Mikkelsen, the head of Udenrigsministeriets Borgerservice, told DR Nyheder.

READ MORE: Search intensifies for last missing Danes in Philippines

One three separate islands
The chaos and destruction that followed in the wake of Haiyan has made the search difficult.

“We believe that they are on three separate islands. The distances are considerable [between the islands] so it can take some time, but the work continues,” Mikkelsen said.

About 1,000 Danes live in the Philippines and 200 of those live in the area ravaged by Haiyan.





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