Young man loses legs after passing out on railway tracks

After starting the night with colleagues, the 16-year-old went to a bar alone before falling asleep on the railway tracks

A 16-year-old who lost both his legs below the knees after being run over by a train at Frederikshavn Station on Sunday morning had passed out drunk on the tracks, reports Ekstra Bladet.

The young man had been out drinking with colleagues the night before and fell asleep on the railway tracks before waking up when the train ran him over at around 5:30am.

“He was woken up by the train and of course the pain and was fully conscious and immediately aware of the consequences of the tragic accident,” Frederikshavn local deputy police commissioner Lars Jensen told Ekstra Bladet.

Life plans dashed
The young man is now being treated at Aalborg Hospital and, according to Jensen, is coming to terms with the impact the accident will have on his life.

“A new and different life awaits him and he probably won’t become the carpenter he had dreamed of becoming,” Jensen said. “He is of course still very upset and he remembers almost nothing from the hours before the tragedy."

According to Ekstra Bladet, the young man started his evening at a Christmas party with colleagues at his job at a butcher’s shop.

Appearing heavily intoxicated, he was turned away from a bar that where his colleagues continued the festivities and went alone to another bar in the town.

The last thing the young man remembers is leaving the bar and walking to the station to catch a train to his home town.

Police are now interviewing his colleagues to determine whether anyone should be held responsible for the accident.





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