In ‘Oliver’ custody case, child listed as missing by Interpol

International custody dispute gets messier after mother reports child as missing to international police organisation

Despite an as yet unsubstantiated letter purported to be from authorities in both Austria and Denmark claiming that the ‘Oliver’ custody case is over, Oliver’s mother, Marion Weilharter, remains on the offensive and has now reported Oliver as a missing person to international police organisation Interpol.

In a press release sent in Danish, German and English, Weilharter refers to Oliver’s father, Thomas Nørregaard Sørensen, as a kidnapper and claims that in April 2012, Sørensen and an assailant kidnapped Oliver from Weilharter's car in Austria and brought him back to Denmark.

Weilharter said that despite the recent letter, which she contends was sent out by Sørensen’s legal team, she has no knowledge that Danish and Austrian authorities have closed Oliver’s case.

READ MORE: Contentious Oliver custody case appears to near completion

Sørensen was convicted of serious assault and child abduction in Austria. Weilharter claims that this makes him an international fugitive and, according to international law, Oliver will remain listed as abducted on Interpol until he is returned to his mother.

Weilharter said that she is planning on taking legal action against the Danish state for ignoring what she says is its legal responsibility to return Oliver to Austria.

Weilharter called Sørensen’s actions “a criminal offence, which in all civilised nations will be judged very strictly”.

Sørensen did not respond to a request for comment.

Along with her press release, Weilharter released a video in which she alleges abuse at the hands of Sørensen and chronicles what she calls her ex-boyfriend's "campaign of revenge", which she alleges has been carried out with "the help of Danish authorities". The video can be viewed below. 





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