Immigration laws render billion kroner investment worthless

Foreign scientists not allowed to work at Swedish facility, despite Denmark paying tenth of the cost to build it

Despite making a 1.4 billion kroner contribution to the construction of the world’s largest microscope, Denmark is unlikely to draw any benefit from the discoveries it makes, reports Jyllands-Posten newspaper. 

Known officially as the European Spallation Source (ESS), the eleven billion kroner facility is being built in Lund, Sweden, putting it more than 50 kilometres away from Denmark and making it too far to qualify as a valid workplace for foreign scientists. 

The ESS is expected to have as many as 5,000 scientists connected to it, but unless immigration laws are changed to allow it to be approved as a workplace, none of them will be able to reside in Denmark.

Hinders indented purpose of investment
“This is just is another case of immigration laws standing in the way of growth,” Vivian Lindberg, a University of Copenhagen official responsible for hiring foreign scholars, said. 

She pointed out that one of the reasons why Denmark chipped in to fund construction of the ESS was so that it could develop an expertise in the field of neutrino analysis, which the facility will specialise in. 

Morten Østergaard, the higher-education minister, said the rule should be changed.





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