Danes using less water but paying more for it

Average water consumption has dropped but water bills keep going up

Danes are using less water than ever before. The total consumption per person last year was 107 litres per day, down from 174 in 1989. According to figures from the Danish water and wastewater association, Danva, water consumption has dropped 13 percent over the last decade.

“It is enormously gratifying to see awareness of water as a limited resource among consumers,” Lars Therkildsen, the head of Danva, told Ritzau. “A Dane consumes half as much water as the average American.”

But even as consumption drops, water bills continue to rise. Over 30 percent of the price of household water bills in recent years has gone to the state for taxes and other charges. The price of water itself has remained relatively stable.

The spike in water costs has come in wastewater management. From 2010-2012, drinking and wastewater companies invested nearly two billion kroner nationwide to stop flooding after heavy rains by replacing old sewers and drains.

“It is true that the combined bill has unfortunately not become cheaper, but people can take some comfort in the fact that had they consumed more water, the bill would be even larger," said Therkildsen. "The investments we are making are necessary.”





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